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The Value of a Good Father

The Value of a Good Father

Michael G. Moriarty, (The Perfect 10: The Blessings of Following God’s Commandments in a Post Modern World, p. 113) reports that: “Almost 75 percent of American children living in fatherless households will experience poverty before the age of eleven, compared to only twenty percent of those raised by two parents. Children living in homes where fathers are absent are far more likely to be expelled from or drop out of school, develop emotional or behavioral problems, commit suicide, and fall victim to child abuse or neglect. The males are also far more likely to become violent criminals. As a matter of fact, men who grew up without dads currently represent over seventy percent of the prison population serving long-term sentences.” Further statistics are staggering.  Numbers from the US Department of Health, US Department of Justice, and the Center for Disease Control, all confirm the usefulness of a quality father in the home.  Study after study quotes similar results. Seems fathers are good for more than just killing bugs and reaching the highest shelf.

The Nazis knew the importance of fathers. In most of the death camps, the first thing they did was divide the families – the father was the first to be pulled away. Pull the family apart and you rob the people of hope. Yet many in our society are doing just that.

There aren’t many good TV dads left. With a few exceptions, the era of Andy Tayor, Father Knows Best, and Ward Cleaver has given way to Homer Simpson or the void of not having a father at all. Its not just in the media, but in politics, the courts, and – sadly – in many churches as well.

There is an attack on fatherhood, but dads, don’t let it defeat you. Keep on being responsible, moral, and loving fathers.

We can’t overlook the fact that some fathers aren’t perfect: A small percentage of fathers do fail. They run away. They abuse. They retreat. Some in our culture do not have a good father, many do not have a father at all. We should ache for them for they truly have a void in their life. A void that some of us need to help fill.

But that aside, as fathers, let’s turn the stats around:

Do you want to reduce teen suicide? Continue being a good committed husband and father.

Want to help a child succeed academically? Continue being a good committed husband and father.

Want to lessen drug use in teens? Continue being a good committed husband and father.

Want to reduce the prison population? Continue being a good committed husband and father.

Want to lower the violent crime rate? Continue being a good committed husband and father.

Want to lower the school drop-out rate? Continue being a good committed husband and father.

Want to lessen runaways on the streets? Continue being a good committed husband and father.

Want to lessen poverty? Continue being a good committed husband and father.

Want to reduce cases of child abuse? Continue being a good committed husband and father.

There is no guarentee all these issues will be avoided in your particular situation, but the odds are vastly improved. Dad, you are so important to your children! They need you to continue being a good committed husband and father.

On Father’s Day we encourage fathers. On Father’s Day, let’s celebrate fathers. On Father’s Day let’s be thankful for fathers.

Happy Father’s Day!

By: Dave Trouten is the married father of two teenage boys and a Division Chair & Professor of Communication at Kingswood University.

Join us at www.just18summers.com for our parenting blog each Monday-Friday and for info about the Just 18 Summers novel.

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