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Everything is Awesome

Everything is Awesome

I like to think of my son’s brain as a rolodex. It’s constantly flip, flip, flipping through ideas, phrases, and impressions. His rolodex contains a plethora of obscure facts about cars, trucks, Teddy Grahams, and LEGOs. Especially LEGOs. He even dreams about LEGOs. In fact, when we tuck him in at night, he squeezes his eyes shut and tells us he’s going to dream about LEGOs. I lovingly refer to him as my little LEGO-maniac.

Every day I hear lyrics about everything being “awesoooooome” belted at the top of his lungs. He learned the words from The LEGO Movie. Never seen it? Don’t tell my son. He’ll come find you and force you to watch it, leaving you with the song on constant repeat in your brain. He’ll also recite the entire movie to you in real time. The. Entire. Movie. And even as I type this, LEGO boy is running around the room sporting a t-shirt that says, “Everything is Awesome.”

Did I mention he loves LEGOs? It’s pretty awesome.

My son’s sponge-like personality is not unique to him. All little ones are constantly absorbing and repeating the things they hear. It’s funny when it’s cute phrases from an innocent movie, but it begs the question: What else is my son hearing? What are the words and phrases and attitudes being impressed on his heart on a daily basis?

A few nights ago at the dinner table, Benjamin turned to me and said, “This is good, Mary. Thanks for making it. So, how was your day?”

After suppressing laughter and informing my son that he could, in fact, call me “Mom,” I realized that no one told him to say those things. He was just repeating what he’d heard from his dad. It made an impression.

On another occasion, I walked into the room to find Benjamin conducting a “church service” with his dad. Bible open on his lap, he asked Daddy, “Do we leave our Bible up on the shelf? No! We read it!” He then launched into a sermon that was an impressive mashup of the endeavors of Moses, Jonah, and Jesus. No one told him to wax eloquent on the content from Genesis to Revelation. He was just repeating what he’d heard. It made an impression.

As an adult, my senses are being bombarded every day. Wherever I go, click, or scroll, someone or something is telling me how to think and perceive the world. Culture is trying to make an impression on my heart. It takes intentional discipline for me to fill my mind with what is good and pure and wholesome. I’ve been working at it my whole life, and it’s still a struggle.

So imagine what’s at stake for our little children.

My husband and I have been entrusted with the hearts of our children for a short time. Just 18 summers, actually. That means that everything we say, do, and expose our children to matters. The way I speak to my husband, read my Bible, take care of our home, interact with others, and engage with culture—it all matters.

I’m humbled when my son mimics the admirable behavior he’s seen in his dad or myself. But I’m driven to my knees when he imitates the parts of me that are weak, selfish, and inconsiderate.

I love my son’s LEGO-filled rolodex. But my prayer is that everything I teach, demonstrate, or expose him to would fill his mind and heart with a love for God and a love for people. That everything would point him to Christ. That everything would have purpose.

Then everything really would be awesome.

By: Mary Holloman is married to her handsome husband of five years and has two children: a two-year old son who never stops moving, and a brand-new baby girl. Mary works and writes for Greensboro Pregnancy Care Center and also serves in her local church’s college ministry. You can follow her daily shenanigans on her blog, All My Springs, which can be found at www.allmyspringsblog.com or follow her on Twitter at @mtholloman.

Join us at www.just18summers.com for our parenting blog each Monday-Friday and for info about the Just 18 Summers novel.

2 Comments

  1. Mary, I enjoyed reading about your little guy. Your post brings back a lot of memories. The imitation doesn’t end. My 21-year-old often says or does something that makes me think she’s my carbon copy. It’s a blessing…most of the time. 🙂 And you should know, “everything is awesome” is going to be stuck in my head the rest of the afternoon! 🙂

    • Haha then we’ll be singing it together, because it’s ALWAYS in mine! 🙂

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